Spiraling Downward: an Illustration of Social Breakdown Theory and Its Relationship With Self-Concept

 

Vicious Cycle:  An Illustration of Social Breakdown Theory and Its Relationship with the Self-Concept

 

Brian P. Brown, Georgia State University

George P. Moschis, Georgia State University

 

ABSTRACT

The present study is based on the social breakdown theory (Kuypers and Bengtson 1973), and is a study of how certain life transition events linked to possible role losses relate to older adults’ self-concepts.  It illustrates how certain environmental conditions (i.e., media) and individual factors (i.e., health, income, and education level) may moderate the relationship between life transitions and self-esteem.  The findings of this study seem to contradict the perspective that marketers are in a particularly strong position to influence the perceptions of society in general, and the life satisfaction and well-being of older adults in particular.



Citation:

Brian Brown and George Moschis (2006) ,"Spiraling Downward: an Illustration of Social Breakdown Theory and Its Relationship With Self-Concept", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 337-338.

Authors

Brian Brown, Georgia State University
George Moschis, Georgia State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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