When Choosing Is Not Deciding: the Effect of Perceived Responsibility on Choice Outcome Satisfaction

When Choosing Is Not Deciding: The Effect of Perceived Responsibility on Choice Outcome Satisfaction

Simona Botti

Cornell University

Ann L. McGill

University of Chicago

 

Prior research has found differences in satisfaction for choosers and non-choosers of the same outcome. Two studies show that differentiability of the choice set options moderates this effect. When options are more differentiated choice enhances satisfaction in positively-valenced choice contexts and dissatisfaction in negatively-valenced choice contexts, but when options are less differentiated choosers experience the same level of satisfaction as non-choosers. We test the hypothesis that the effect of outcome differentiability is due to differences in perceived level of responsibility and subsequent self-credit and self-blame for the decision outcome. A third study separates the effects of differentiability from random choice.



Citation:

Simona Botti and Ann L. McGill (2006) ,"When Choosing Is Not Deciding: the Effect of Perceived Responsibility on Choice Outcome Satisfaction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 512-513.

Authors

Simona Botti, Cornell University
Ann L. McGill, University of Chicago



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

C8. Can Packaging Imagery Fill Your Stomach? Effects of Product Image Location on Flavor Richness, Consumption Quantity, and Subsequent Choice

Taku Togawa, Chiba University of Commerce
Jaewoo Park, Musashi University
Hiroaki Ishii, Seikei University
Xiaoyan Deng, Ohio State University, USA

Read More

Featured

P12. Disclosure of Project Risk in Crowdfunding

Jooyoung Park, Peking University
KEONGTAE KIM, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

Read More

Featured

Trust, but Verify: A Multi-level Examination of Online Reviews and Persuasion Knowledge

Martin A. Pyle, Ryerson University
Andrew Smith, Suffolk University
Yanina Chevtchouk, University of Glasgow

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.