Religion As a Consumer Acculturation Variable: the Case of British Indians

ABSTRACT - The inter-relationship between religiosity, culture and acculturation is explored within the context of British Indians’ consumer behaviour. Literature indicates a strong relationship between religious identity, self-identity and the acculturation process. Quantitative data analysis, using multiple regression analysis, indicated a significant relationships between religiosity levels, temple attendance and consumption orientation among British Indians, when compared to British Caucasians. The paper concludes that declining religiosity can be identified with acculturation categories of assimilation and marginality.



Citation:

Andrew Lindridge (2003) ,"Religion As a Consumer Acculturation Variable: the Case of British Indians", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6, eds. Darach Turley and Stephen Brown, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 96.

European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6, 2003      Page 96

RELIGION AS A CONSUMER ACCULTURATION VARIABLE: THE CASE OF BRITISH INDIANS

Andrew Lindridge, UMIST, UK

ABSTRACT -

The inter-relationship between religiosity, culture and acculturation is explored within the context of British Indians’ consumer behaviour. Literature indicates a strong relationship between religious identity, self-identity and the acculturation process. Quantitative data analysis, using multiple regression analysis, indicated a significant relationships between religiosity levels, temple attendance and consumption orientation among British Indians, when compared to British Caucasians. The paper concludes that declining religiosity can be identified with acculturation categories of assimilation and marginality.

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Authors

Andrew Lindridge, UMIST, UK



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6 | 2003



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