The Impact of Contrast Interval Length and Type on Information Retention: Are Silence and Music Equivalent?

ABSTRACT - Highlighting certain items of information in an auditory context by altering the background underlying this information (i.e., employing a contrast interval) has been demonstrated to enhance recall. This research pursues this issue further, and manipulates both the amount of information highlighted and the nature of highlighting in an experimental context. Results suggest that the optimal contrast interval is a maximum of three seconds long. Additionally, findings indicate that recall is superior in conditions where information is highlighted with silence relative to conditions where information is highlighted with music.



Citation:

Douglas Olsen (2001) ,"The Impact of Contrast Interval Length and Type on Information Retention: Are Silence and Music Equivalent?", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5, eds. Andrea Groeppel-Klien and Frank-Rudolf Esch, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 210.

European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5, 2001      Page 210

THE IMPACT OF CONTRAST INTERVAL LENGTH AND TYPE ON INFORMATION RETENTION: ARE SILENCE AND MUSIC EQUIVALENT?

Douglas Olsen, University of Alberta, Canada

ABSTRACT -

Highlighting certain items of information in an auditory context by altering the background underlying this information (i.e., employing a contrast interval) has been demonstrated to enhance recall. This research pursues this issue further, and manipulates both the amount of information highlighted and the nature of highlighting in an experimental context. Results suggest that the optimal contrast interval is a maximum of three seconds long. Additionally, findings indicate that recall is superior in conditions where information is highlighted with silence relative to conditions where information is highlighted with music.

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Authors

Douglas Olsen, University of Alberta, Canada



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5 | 2001



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