An Empirical Study of the Quality and Context-Specific Applicability of Commonly Used Customer Satisfaction Measures

ABSTRACT - Many different measures have been used in customer satisfaction research, but few studies have examined the context-specific applicability of these measures. In this study, nine commonly used satisfaction measures were examined for their cognitive and/or affective content. In contrast to what was hypothesized, all measures captured both factors, although with slightly differing degrees. The study also investigated whether the selection of satisfaction measures should be a function of product benefits. Specifically, it was hypothesized that affective measures would be better for products with mostly hedonic benefits, and cognitive measures for products with utilitarian benefits. The findings rejected this notion. Rather, measures which were shown to be of good quality (i.e. have good reliability and low error variances) were equally applicable across all product benefits tested.



Citation:

Lee Meng Chung and Jochen Wirtz (2001) ,"An Empirical Study of the Quality and Context-Specific Applicability of Commonly Used Customer Satisfaction Measures", in AP - Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, eds. Paula M. Tidwell and Thomas E. Muller, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 336.

Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, 2001      Page 336

AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF THE QUALITY AND CONTEXT-SPECIFIC APPLICABILITY OF COMMONLY USED CUSTOMER SATISFACTION MEASURES

Lee Meng Chung, Research International Asia Pte. Ltd., Singapore

Jochen Wirtz, National University of Singapore, Singapore

[This paper is based on Meng Chung Lee=s MSc thesis with the Department of Marketing at the National University of Singapore.]

ABSTRACT -

Many different measures have been used in customer satisfaction research, but few studies have examined the context-specific applicability of these measures. In this study, nine commonly used satisfaction measures were examined for their cognitive and/or affective content. In contrast to what was hypothesized, all measures captured both factors, although with slightly differing degrees. The study also investigated whether the selection of satisfaction measures should be a function of product benefits. Specifically, it was hypothesized that affective measures would be better for products with mostly hedonic benefits, and cognitive measures for products with utilitarian benefits. The findings rejected this notion. Rather, measures which were shown to be of good quality (i.e. have good reliability and low error variances) were equally applicable across all product benefits tested.

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Authors

Lee Meng Chung, Research International Asia Pte. Ltd., Singapore
Jochen Wirtz, National University of Singapore, Singapore



Volume

AP - Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4 | 2001



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