Working Paper Session



Citation:

Chad Perry (2001) ,"Working Paper Session", in AP - Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, eds. Paula M. Tidwell and Thomas E. Muller, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 337.

Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, 2001      Page 337

WORKING PAPER SESSION

Chad Perry, University of Southern Queensland, Australia (Chair)

 

"EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF STANDARD VERSUS SPECIALISED ADVERTISING FOR MULTI-CULTURAL TARGET MARKETS"

Brad Bowes, Griffith University, Australia

Dick Mizerski, University of Western Australia

Kathryn Straughn-Mizerski, Murdoch University

Would you fly with an airline whose name meant "misery", or was "EMU", an Australian bird incapable of flight? Would you buy a chocolate bar called "Zit", or consume a soft drink whose advertising message translated as "bring your ancestors back from the dead"? These and other international marketing blunders are reported in the literature as a result of a lack of research, poor translation, or insensitivities to the language and culture of other nationalities. Evidence from the literature seems to indicate that a specialised approach to advertising is more appropriate than a standardised approach when market homogeneity cannot be established. This is particularly significant with non-durable goods and services advertised to a cultural group such as Asians who are quite different from a typical western cultural profile. This Paper will analyse the findings from an experimental manipulation.

 

"HOW TO EVOKE DESIRES: AN ADVERTISING INFORMATION PROCESSING MODEL BASED ON COGNITIVE APPRAISAL THEORIES"

Yuichiro Kato, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Akifumi Tokosumi, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

This article focuses on the effect of emotional response to achieve purchase intentions in advertising information processes. Based on cognitive appraisal theories which emphasize that emotions are parts of cognition, three psychological experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of emotions. The results confirmed that (a) the motivation to purchase a product is higher when the understanding about product properties is accompanied with emotional responses, (b) two different understanding processes are observed: understanding about product properties and understanding about a brand character, (c) the motivation to purchase a product is higher when these two understanding processes interact each other.

 

"CONSUMERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF CHINESE VS WESTERN MEDICINE"

Francis Piron, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Chan Wai Ching, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Esme Cheong Ai Peng, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Ho lee Ching, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

In Singapore, the use of Chinese medicine has existed with Western medicine for a long time. The Western medicine is often recognised as the dominant form of health practice in Singapore. However, in recent years, there has been a growing interest in Chinese medicine as a form of alternative treatment. This study focuses on the consumers’ perceptions, attitudes and beliefs towards Chinese medicine. It offers a discussion of the application of statistical techniques in the analysis of positioning of comparable Chinese and Western medicine. In addition, the study also identifies the future trends in the usage of Chinese medicine in Singapore.

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Authors

Chad Perry, University of Southern Queensland, Australia (Chair)



Volume

AP - Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4 | 2001



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