Bless Or Curse: How Top-Of-The Line Models Affect the Evaluation of Other Models

ABSTRACT - Two studies investigated how an extremely positive brand model (flagship) influences the evaluation of more moderate models. In Study 1 a flagship model elicited contrast in the evaluation of other more moderate models irrespective of whether these were of the same or a competitor brand. However, the contrast effect was eliminated for the same brand model when the shared brand-membership of the flagship and the more standard model was made salient. As a consequence the same brand model gained an advantage over a similar competitor. Study 2 provided evidence that by emphasizing the brand-membership of flagship and more moderate version the brand as a whole benefited which in turn favorably influenced any other brand member. Theoretically most noteworthy, Study 2 provided evidence that assimilation and contrast may not be exclusive to each other but may well work in parallel.



Citation:

Michaela Wanke and Herbert Bless (2001) ,"Bless Or Curse: How Top-Of-The Line Models Affect the Evaluation of Other Models", in AP - Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, eds. Paula M. Tidwell and Thomas E. Muller, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 275.

Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, 2001      Page 275

BLESS OR CURSE: HOW TOP-OF-THE LINE MODELS AFFECT THE EVALUATION OF OTHER MODELS

Michaela Wanke, Universitat Heidelberg, Germany

Herbert Bless, Universitat Mannheim, Germany

ABSTRACT -

Two studies investigated how an extremely positive brand model (flagship) influences the evaluation of more moderate models. In Study 1 a flagship model elicited contrast in the evaluation of other more moderate models irrespective of whether these were of the same or a competitor brand. However, the contrast effect was eliminated for the same brand model when the shared brand-membership of the flagship and the more standard model was made salient. As a consequence the same brand model gained an advantage over a similar competitor. Study 2 provided evidence that by emphasizing the brand-membership of flagship and more moderate version the brand as a whole benefited which in turn favorably influenced any other brand member. Theoretically most noteworthy, Study 2 provided evidence that assimilation and contrast may not be exclusive to each other but may well work in parallel.

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Authors

Michaela Wanke, Universitat Heidelberg, Germany
Herbert Bless, Universitat Mannheim, Germany



Volume

AP - Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4 | 2001



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