Learning From Mixed Feedback: the Biased Processing of Store Price Comparisons

ABSTRACT - People learn about the quality of their decisions by comparing their obtained outcomes to alternative outcomes. Often, feedback is mixed: the chosen option performs better than one alternative but worse than another. We examine how people’s reaction to mixed price comparisons is influenced by their motivation to learn from these comparisons. Our results indicate that people who are motivated to evaluate their choices selectively search for opportunities to improve, leading them to overemphasize unfavorable comparisons and underestimate the value of their current selection.



Citation:

Tom Meyvis and Alan Cooke (2003) ,"Learning From Mixed Feedback: the Biased Processing of Store Price Comparisons", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6, eds. Darach Turley and Stephen Brown, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 375.

European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6, 2003      Page 375

LEARNING FROM MIXED FEEDBACK: THE BIASED PROCESSING OF STORE PRICE COMPARISONS

Tom Meyvis, New York University, USA

Alan Cooke, University of Florida, USA

ABSTRACT -

People learn about the quality of their decisions by comparing their obtained outcomes to alternative outcomes. Often, feedback is mixed: the chosen option performs better than one alternative but worse than another. We examine how people’s reaction to mixed price comparisons is influenced by their motivation to learn from these comparisons. Our results indicate that people who are motivated to evaluate their choices selectively search for opportunities to improve, leading them to overemphasize unfavorable comparisons and underestimate the value of their current selection.

----------------------------------------

Authors

Tom Meyvis, New York University, USA
Alan Cooke, University of Florida, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6 | 2003



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

C8. Can Packaging Imagery Fill Your Stomach? Effects of Product Image Location on Flavor Richness, Consumption Quantity, and Subsequent Choice

Taku Togawa, Chiba University of Commerce
Jaewoo Park, Musashi University
Hiroaki Ishii, Seikei University
Xiaoyan Deng, Ohio State University, USA

Read More

Featured

Foods for Sharing: The Social Value of Handmade Foods

Xin Wang, Nanjing University
Chunqu Xiao, Nanjing University
Xingyu Duan, Nanjing University
Hong Zhu, Nanjing University

Read More

Featured

F8. Dual Routes for Consumer Responses to Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Positive Moral Emotions, Attitudes, and Empathy

Chunyan Xie, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences
Richard P. Bagozzi, University of Michigan, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.