Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Information Processing in the Repurchase Decision

ABSTRACT - This research examines how consumers process information in a stay-switch decision. The results suggest that consumers process different information and arrive at different conclusions based on how the decision is framed. In the first two experiments, using either consumers’ own behavior or scenarios, a switch frame increased the consideration of other brands and lowered repurchase likelihood relative to a stay frame. These results reveal an asymmetry in information processing across frames and also contradict the theory that anticipated regret associated with actions such as switching should increase, rather than decrease, repurchase, which is examined explicitly in Experiment 3.



Citation:

Lisa J. Abendroth (2003) ,"Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Information Processing in the Repurchase Decision", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6, eds. Darach Turley and Stephen Brown, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 289.

European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6, 2003      Page 289

SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO? INFORMATION PROCESSING IN THE REPURCHASE DECISION

Lisa J. Abendroth, Boston University, USA

ABSTRACT -

This research examines how consumers process information in a stay-switch decision. The results suggest that consumers process different information and arrive at different conclusions based on how the decision is framed. In the first two experiments, using either consumers’ own behavior or scenarios, a switch frame increased the consideration of other brands and lowered repurchase likelihood relative to a stay frame. These results reveal an asymmetry in information processing across frames and also contradict the theory that anticipated regret associated with actions such as switching should increase, rather than decrease, repurchase, which is examined explicitly in Experiment 3.

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Authors

Lisa J. Abendroth, Boston University, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 6 | 2003



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