Are Negative Frames More Persuasive Than Positive Frames For Senior Citizens? An Exploratory Investigation of Age Differences in Framing Effects

ABSTRACT - The author explores the role of age differences in framing effects. Marketing studies in general have shown that negatively framed messages are more effective under conditions of high issue involvement. Public service campaign studies, on the other hand, claim that positively framed messages are more effective in encouraging healthy behaviors. Based on cognitive aging theory, it was hypothesized that prevention oriented behaviors are facilitated by positively framed messages for senior citizens. A significant interaction between age and framing lends support to this argument. Given a high involvement and prevention oriented behavior, positively framed messages were more effective for seniors compared to their younger counterparts who were influenced by negatively framed messages. Implications for persuasion and public policy are discussed.



Citation:

Rama Jayanti (2001) ,"Are Negative Frames More Persuasive Than Positive Frames For Senior Citizens? An Exploratory Investigation of Age Differences in Framing Effects", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5, eds. Andrea Groeppel-Klien and Frank-Rudolf Esch, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 336.

European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5, 2001      Page 336

ARE NEGATIVE FRAMES MORE PERSUASIVE THAN POSITIVE FRAMES FOR SENIOR CITIZENS? AN EXPLORATORY INVESTIGATION OF AGE DIFFERENCES IN FRAMING EFFECTS

Rama Jayanti, Cleveland State University, U.S.A.

ABSTRACT -

The author explores the role of age differences in framing effects. Marketing studies in general have shown that negatively framed messages are more effective under conditions of high issue involvement. Public service campaign studies, on the other hand, claim that positively framed messages are more effective in encouraging healthy behaviors. Based on cognitive aging theory, it was hypothesized that prevention oriented behaviors are facilitated by positively framed messages for senior citizens. A significant interaction between age and framing lends support to this argument. Given a high involvement and prevention oriented behavior, positively framed messages were more effective for seniors compared to their younger counterparts who were influenced by negatively framed messages. Implications for persuasion and public policy are discussed.

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Authors

Rama Jayanti, Cleveland State University, U.S.A.



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5 | 2001



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