From Really New to More of the Same: the Effect of Familiarization on the Classification of Hybrid Products

ABSTRACT - Hybrid products (i.e., combinations of two or more existing products) are often introduced as really new products that are placed in a category of their own. This study examines the hypothesis that hybrid products are only perceived to be really new and classified accordingly, when consumers have not yet had actual experience with these products. The results show that unfamiliar hybrid products were classified into separate categories, whereas familiar products were categorized together with the source product they were most congruent with. Furthermore, unfamiliar hybrids were harder to categorize. Theoretical and marketing implications are given.



Citation:

Kaj P.N. Morel, Jan P.L. Schoormans, and Peeter W.J. Verlegh (2001) ,"From Really New to More of the Same: the Effect of Familiarization on the Classification of Hybrid Products", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5, eds. Andrea Groeppel-Klien and Frank-Rudolf Esch, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 16.

European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5, 2001      Page 16

FROM REALLY NEW TO MORE OF THE SAME: THE EFFECT OF FAMILIARIZATION ON THE CLASSIFICATION OF HYBRID PRODUCTS

Kaj P.N. Morel, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Jan P.L. Schoormans, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Peeter W.J. Verlegh, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

ABSTRACT -

Hybrid products (i.e., combinations of two or more existing products) are often introduced as really new products that are placed in a category of their own. This study examines the hypothesis that hybrid products are only perceived to be really new and classified accordingly, when consumers have not yet had actual experience with these products. The results show that unfamiliar hybrid products were classified into separate categories, whereas familiar products were categorized together with the source product they were most congruent with. Furthermore, unfamiliar hybrids were harder to categorize. Theoretical and marketing implications are given.

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Authors

Kaj P.N. Morel, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Jan P.L. Schoormans, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Peeter W.J. Verlegh, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 5 | 2001



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