How Incidental Confidence Influences Self-Interested Behaviors? a Double-Edged Sword

The present research investigates how incidental confidence influences self-interested behaviors and showed in four experiments that lower incidental confidence increases (decreases) self-interested behaviors when money (altruism) is the primary signal of status that helps compensating for confidence. Data ruled out affect, power, self-esteem, self-efficacy, effort, and fairness as alternative explanations.



Citation:

Claire Tsai and Jia lin Xie (2017) ,"How Incidental Confidence Influences Self-Interested Behaviors? a Double-Edged Sword", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 718-721.

Authors

Claire Tsai, University of Toronto, Canada
Jia lin Xie, University of Toronto, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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