13-D: Extending the Herding Effect to the Consumption Experience: the Case of Online Music

Others’ opinions can act as a heuristic when deciding what to consume. However, we show the “herding effect” also affects preferences during consumption. We find social information is more important for some individuals and for some music types, and can have strong negative effects on song preferences in online environments.



Citation:

Zachary Krastel and H. Onur Bodur (2017) ,"13-D: Extending the Herding Effect to the Consumption Experience: the Case of Online Music", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1041-1041.

Authors

Zachary Krastel, Concordia University, Canada
H. Onur Bodur, Concordia University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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