More Harm Is Less Dangerous

People are less likely to adopt preventive actions when they are informed of two equally threatening and likely health risks, compared with when they are informed of one of the two risks. This happens because a single health risk can be more vividly imagined compared with multiple health risks. 



Citation:

Monica Wadhwa and Mustafa Karatas (2017) ,"More Harm Is Less Dangerous", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 940-942.

Authors

Monica Wadhwa, INSEAD, Singapore
Mustafa Karatas, Koc University, Turkey



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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