17-M: the Dark Side of Competition: How Competition Results Predict Unethical Behavior

Our findings suggest that the association between competition results and unethical behaviors is moderated by power such that in the high power conditions, losers are more likely to engage in unethical behaviors than winners. When differentiating beneficiaries of unethical behaviors, a three-way interaction shows that both winners and losers lie.



Citation:

Rui Du, Qimei Chen, and Miao Hu (2017) ,"17-M: the Dark Side of Competition: How Competition Results Predict Unethical Behavior ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1025-1025.

Authors

Rui Du, University of Hawaii, USA
Qimei Chen, University of Hawaii, USA
Miao Hu, University of Hawaii, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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