9-T: Savoring Stress: Can Feeling Stressed Reduce the Rate of Satiation?

In this research, we propose that stress reduces the rate of satiation to hedonic consumption experiences. In order to restore control, stressed individuals engage more with the activities they are currently pursuing. As a result, they take longer to satiate to music (study 1), and food (study 2).



Citation:

Benjamin Borenstein, Juliano Laran, and Luke Nowlan (2017) ,"9-T: Savoring Stress: Can Feeling Stressed Reduce the Rate of Satiation?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1015-1015.

Authors

Benjamin Borenstein, University of Miami, USA
Juliano Laran, University of Miami, USA
Luke Nowlan, University of Miami, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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