Label Structure, Processing Disfluency, and Consumers’ Responses to Credence-Labeled Foods

Three studies demonstrate that label structure influences consumers’ responses to foods using credence labels such as “organic,” “hormone-free,” and “gluten-free.” Product-level credence-labels are more difficult to understand (i.e., less fluently processed) than ingredient-level credence-labels, which results in less favorable attitudes. Evidence for this process is found via mediation and moderation.



Citation:

Jeffrey R. Parker, Omar Rodriguez-Vila, Ryan Hamilton, Iman Paul, and Sundar Bharadwaj (2017) ,"Label Structure, Processing Disfluency, and Consumers’ Responses to Credence-Labeled Foods", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 158-163.

Authors

Jeffrey R. Parker, Georgia State University, USA
Omar Rodriguez-Vila, Georgia Tech, USA
Ryan Hamilton, Emory University, USA
Iman Paul, Georgia Tech, USA
Sundar Bharadwaj , University of Georgia, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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