Effects of Matched and Mismatched Comparative Advertising Messages: the Moderating Role of Consumers’ Processing Focus

Across two experiments, we find that consumers with a cognitive focus find comparative messages mismatching the ad context (e.g., using “better than the leading brand” comparative claims to promote a product in a large category) more effective. The reverse was true for consumers with an affective focus.



Citation:

Xiaojing Yang, Shailendra Jain , Charles Lindsey, and Frank Kardes (2017) ,"Effects of Matched and Mismatched Comparative Advertising Messages: the Moderating Role of Consumers’ Processing Focus ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 976-976.

Authors

Xiaojing Yang, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA
Shailendra Jain , University of Washington, USA
Charles Lindsey, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA
Frank Kardes, University of Cincinnati, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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