Why Do Goals Cause Cheating? Unpacking the Confounding Effects of Mere Goals, Social Comparisons, and Pay

Past studies that associated goal-based incentives with cheating introduced goals simultaneously with changes to social comparison information and/or monetary pay. We use a controlled experiment to disentangle cheating caused by mere goals, social comparison framing, and monetary incentives. The latter two increased cheating, but mere goals alone did not.



Citation:

Matthew Chao and Ian Larkin (2017) ,"Why Do Goals Cause Cheating? Unpacking the Confounding Effects of Mere Goals, Social Comparisons, and Pay", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 346-349.

Authors

Matthew Chao, Williams College, USA
Ian Larkin, University of California Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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