Friends Without Benefits? How the Costs of Having a Relationship Influence Risk-Taking

While having close relationships is known to increase risk-taking, we identify conditions leading to reduced risk-taking. When consumers focus on the costs (rather than benefits) of having a relationship and when the risk consequence affects both relationship partners, risk-taking decreases. However, when individuals lack these close relationships, risk-taking behavior increases.



Citation:

Jennifer K. Lee and Lisa A. Cavanaugh (2017) ,"Friends Without Benefits? How the Costs of Having a Relationship Influence Risk-Taking", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1075-1075.

Authors

Jennifer K. Lee, University of Southern California, USA
Lisa A. Cavanaugh, University of British Columbia, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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