The Influences of Randomly Displaying a Set of Products on Shopping Evaluations

Five experiments show that a randomly displayed set of products can elicit a higher level of arousal than a categorized set, increasing consumers’ emotional reactions and the favorableness of their shopping evaluations. This effect only occurs when shopping is not task-oriented and when consumers’ attitude towards shopping is positive.



Citation:

Tao Tao and Leilei Gao (2017) ,"The Influences of Randomly Displaying a Set of Products on Shopping Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 101-106.

Authors

Tao Tao, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Leilei Gao, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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