Losing Our Most Special Possession: the Unexpected Positivity of Dying

In our imagination, losing our most valuable possession—our lives—seems distressing. However, two studies reveal that terminally ill patients (S1) and death row inmates (S2) are more positive than individuals simulating the experience of these deaths. This suggests that dying may be more pleasant than we imagine.



Citation:

Amelia Goranson, Ryan Ritter, Adam Waytz, Michael I. Norton, and Kurt Gray (2017) ,"Losing Our Most Special Possession: the Unexpected Positivity of Dying", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 228-232.

Authors

Amelia Goranson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Ryan Ritter, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Adam Waytz, Northwestern University, USA
Michael I. Norton, Harvard University, USA
Kurt Gray, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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