My Favorite Thing: How Special Possessions Can Increase Subjective Wellbeing

Valuing material possessions can increase wellbeing if consumers focus on possessions that are most special to them. In three studies, consumers who recalled a special possession reported greater subjective wellbeing than those who did not. This effect was mediated by a sense of connectedness derived from one’s special possession.



Citation:

(Joyce) Jingshi Liu, Amy N. Dalton, and Anirban Mukhopadhyay (2017) ,"My Favorite Thing: How Special Possessions Can Increase Subjective Wellbeing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 228-232.

Authors

(Joyce) Jingshi Liu, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Amy N. Dalton, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Anirban Mukhopadhyay, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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