My Favorite Thing: How Special Possessions Can Increase Subjective Wellbeing

Valuing material possessions can increase wellbeing if consumers focus on possessions that are most special to them. In three studies, consumers who recalled a special possession reported greater subjective wellbeing than those who did not. This effect was mediated by a sense of connectedness derived from one’s special possession.



Citation:

(Joyce) Jingshi Liu, Amy N. Dalton, and Anirban Mukhopadhyay (2017) ,"My Favorite Thing: How Special Possessions Can Increase Subjective Wellbeing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 228-232.

Authors

(Joyce) Jingshi Liu, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Amy N. Dalton, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Anirban Mukhopadhyay, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Can “Related Articles” Correct Misperceptions from False Information on Social Media?

Yu Ding, Columbia University, USA
Mira Mayrhofer, University of Vienna
Gita Venkataramani Johar, Columbia University, USA

Read More

Featured

Brands as Mediators: A Research Agenda

Philipp K. Wegerer, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Read More

Featured

G9. The Voice From Afar: How Reverberation Affects Consumer Cognition

Johann Melzner, New York University, USA
Jochim Hansen, University of Salzburg

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.