To Thrive Or to Suffer At the Hand of Busyness: How Lay Theories of Busyness Influence Psychological Empowerment and Volunteering

Busyness is frequently reported as a major barrier to volunteering. In this research, we argue that it is not busyness per se, but rather the lay theory about the feeling of busyness that people hold (feeling busy = good vs. feeling busy = bad) that influences volunteering behavior.



Citation:

Mahdi Ebrahimi, Melanie Rudd, and Vanessa Patrick (2017) ,"To Thrive Or to Suffer At the Hand of Busyness: How Lay Theories of Busyness Influence Psychological Empowerment and Volunteering", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 79-84.

Authors

Mahdi Ebrahimi, University of Houston, USA
Melanie Rudd, University of Houston, USA
Vanessa Patrick, University of Houston, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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