Sadness Reduces Decisiveness

Sadness makes people feel uncertain about outcomes and coping abilities. This uncertainty can spill over to unrelated domains, reducing decisiveness. In three experiments, we found that sadness increased choice deferral, reduced the commitment to a single course of action, and delayed purchase decisions, even when hesitation was costly.



Citation:

Beatriz Pereira and Scott Rick (2017) ,"Sadness Reduces Decisiveness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 812-814.

Authors

Beatriz Pereira, Iowa State University, USA
Scott Rick, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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