Personal Control and Perceived Product Efficacy

We demonstrate that low (vs. high) personal control increases perceived product efficacy. This phenomenon represents a combination of strategies to regain control: Efficacious products are external sources of control, and perceiving greater efficacy thus implies using an external source to bolster one’s own ability to bring about desired outcomes.



Citation:

Noah VanBergen and Caglar Irmak (2017) ,"Personal Control and Perceived Product Efficacy", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 930-931.

Authors

Noah VanBergen, University of Miami, USA
Caglar Irmak, University of Miami, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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