11-M: Puritan Peers Or Egoistic Entrepreneurs? An Examination of Moral Identity in Collaborative Consumption

Despite proponents of collaborative consumption portraying peers as moral citizens of society, recent findings suggest that egoistic motives drive participation. Platform-providing firms rely on users’ cooperative behaviors; thus, this research examines how prolonged participation diminishes moral identity. Findings reveal important implications for the success of emerging peer exchange business models.



Citation:

Rebeca Perren and Kristin Stewart (2017) ,"11-M: Puritan Peers Or Egoistic Entrepreneurs? An Examination of Moral Identity in Collaborative Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1054-1054.

Authors

Rebeca Perren, California State University San Marcos, USA
Kristin Stewart, California State University San Marcos, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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