When Touch Interfaces Boost Consumer Confidence: the Role of Instrumental Need For Touch

Five studies demonstrate that using touch-based (vs. non-touch) computer interfaces can boost consumer confidence that influences judgments and decisions in multiple contexts. This effect is particularly strong for consumers who derive judgmental confidence from touching physical objects and (mistakenly) apply the touch-confidence relationship to a digital context.



Citation:

Johannes Hattula, Walter Herzog, and Dhar Ravi (2017) ,"When Touch Interfaces Boost Consumer Confidence: the Role of Instrumental Need For Touch", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 25-30.

Authors

Johannes Hattula, Imperial College Business School, UK
Walter Herzog, WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management, Germany
Dhar Ravi, Yale University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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