Consumer-Brand Relationships in Conspiratorial Narratives

This paper takes a poststructuralist view to analyze conspiratorial consumer-brand relationships. Drawing on literature in the social sciences and a discourse analysis of 30 conspiracy narratives retrieved online, we show how consumers and brands can play the role of victim or culprit.



Citation:

Mathieu Alemany Oliver (2017) ,"Consumer-Brand Relationships in Conspiratorial Narratives", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 496-497.

Authors

Mathieu Alemany Oliver, Toulouse Business School, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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