13-J: the Effect of Stress on Consumers' Private Information Disclosure

Consumer privacy in the age of big data is an important research topic for consumer researchers. In two studies, we examine how stress affects private information disclosure. Results show that stress increases consumers’ likelihood of answering highly-sensitive and even incriminating questions affirmatively, while potentially making them susceptible to privacy risks.



Citation:

Sinem Acar-Burkay and Bob M. Fennis (2017) ,"13-J: the Effect of Stress on Consumers' Private Information Disclosure ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1011-1011.

Authors

Sinem Acar-Burkay, University College of Southeast Norway, Norway
Bob M. Fennis, University of Groningen, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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