The Mere Cost Effect

We propose a novel mechanism explaining behavior change failures: the mere perception of a cost to change behavior hinders one’s willingness to do so, even when the benefit of change greatly outweighs the cost. Further, the longer a consumer engages in a suboptimal behavior the greater this cost is perceived.



Citation:

Alicea J. Lieberman, On Amir, and Ziv Carmon (2017) ,"The Mere Cost Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 212-216.

Authors

Alicea J. Lieberman, University of California, San Diego, USA
On Amir, University of California, San Diego, USA
Ziv Carmon, INSEAD, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

A6. “Alexa, let’s make a trade”: Search Behavior, Trust, and Privacy with Voice-Activated Assistants

Weizi Liu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
David William Ross, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Kieshana M. Williams-Beeler, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Yoonah Lee, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Michelle Renee Nelson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Read More

Featured

Potions and Antidotes for Jekyll: What Summons Moral Identity in Product Choices

Young Joo Cho, Korea University, Korea
Y. Rin Yoon, Korea University, Korea
Jongwon Park, Korea University, Korea

Read More

Featured

Divorcing the Market

Deniz Atik, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
A. Fuat Fırat, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
Ebru Uzunoğlu, Izmir University of Economics

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.