The Mere Cost Effect

We propose a novel mechanism explaining behavior change failures: the mere perception of a cost to change behavior hinders one’s willingness to do so, even when the benefit of change greatly outweighs the cost. Further, the longer a consumer engages in a suboptimal behavior the greater this cost is perceived.



Citation:

Alicea J. Lieberman, On Amir, and Ziv Carmon (2017) ,"The Mere Cost Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 212-216.

Authors

Alicea J. Lieberman, University of California, San Diego, USA
On Amir, University of California, San Diego, USA
Ziv Carmon, INSEAD, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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