Going With the Flow-Ency: the Role of Perceived Control on Fluency Effects

Across four experiments, we find that perceptions of high control reduce fluency effects, whereas low perceived control facilitates fluency effects. We further show that this is because experiences of high vs. low control differentially influence people’s affective responses to fluency.



Citation:

Jerry Han and Claire Tsai (2017) ,"Going With the Flow-Ency: the Role of Perceived Control on Fluency Effects", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 652-653.

Authors

Jerry Han, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Claire Tsai, University of Toronto, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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