A Case For Low Power: Self Versus Response Efficacy in Health Persuasion

This research investigates what types of health appeals persuade individuals with low (vs. high) power mindsets. Across different health scenarios, we show that self (vs. response) efficacy messages are less effective among low (vs. high) power individuals. Skepticism among low (vs. high) power individuals is the underlying novel process.



Citation:

Meng-Hua Hsieh, Chethana Achar, and Nidhi Agrawal (2017) ,"A Case For Low Power: Self Versus Response Efficacy in Health Persuasion", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 665-666.

Authors

Meng-Hua Hsieh, Pennsylvania State University-Harrisburg, USA
Chethana Achar, University of Washington, USA
Nidhi Agrawal, University of Washington, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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