1-G: I Want the Best, So Give Me All the Bells and Whistles: How Maximizers Versus Satisficers Evaluate Feature-Rich Products

We find that maximizers (vs. satisficers) give more favorable evaluations to feature-rich products, indicating that they are less likely to anticipate feature fatigue. Underlying this relationship is a dual process, whereby maximizers perceive feature-rich products as status signals, as well as overestimate how much they will use the additional features.



Citation:

Daniel Brannon and Brandon Soltwisch (2017) ,"1-G: I Want the Best, So Give Me All the Bells and Whistles: How Maximizers Versus Satisficers Evaluate Feature-Rich Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1016-1016.

Authors

Daniel Brannon, University of Northern Colorado, USA
Brandon Soltwisch, University of Northern Colorado, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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