Will It Taste Better If You Think About What You Are Eating? Cultural Differences in Food-Ingredient Information Seeking

This research examines the cultural differences in ingredient information seeking when consumers evaluate foods. Through four studies, we show that compared to Chinese, Americans have a greater need for ingredient information and process this information more separately, thus evaluating foods more favorably when the ingredients are displayed separated (vs. mixed).



Citation:

Hao Shen and Jun Pang (2017) ,"Will It Taste Better If You Think About What You Are Eating? Cultural Differences in Food-Ingredient Information Seeking ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 878-878.

Authors

Hao Shen, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Jun Pang, Renmin University of China, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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