Same Same, But Different: How Refutational Two-Sided Messages Steer Ambivalent Attitudes

This research introduces attitudinal ambivalence to message sidedness literature. The results show that two-sided messages only work when ambivalence is low (study 1). Including a refutation in a two-sided message overcomes this limitation (study 2) if this refutation is based on the same (vs. different) product attribute (study 3).



Citation:

Anuja Majmundar, Erlinde Cornelis, and Nico Heuvinck (2017) ,"Same Same, But Different: How Refutational Two-Sided Messages Steer Ambivalent Attitudes ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 769-770.

Authors

Anuja Majmundar, University of Southern California, USA
Erlinde Cornelis, San Diego State University, USA
Nico Heuvinck, IÉSEG School of Management, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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