4-F: Essentialism Increases Status Consumption of High-Class (Not Low-Class) Consumers

We proposed that essentialist beliefs of social class (i.e., social class is immutable and biological-based) would increase status consumption of high- but not low-class people. With both measuring and manipulating essentialism, four studies consistently supported the hypothesis. We further found that entitlement could explain the relationship.



Citation:

Xue Wang, Ying-Yi Hong, and Robert S. Wyer (2017) ,"4-F: Essentialism Increases Status Consumption of High-Class (Not Low-Class) Consumers", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1065-1065.

Authors

Xue Wang, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Ying-Yi Hong, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Robert S. Wyer, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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