20-R: Weird Products: Too Weird For Purchase, But Perfect For Sharing.

This paper challenges the common view that weirdness is negative and usually leads to negative consumers’ responses. Specifically, we found that compared to regular products, consumers’ information-share (purchase) intentions and behavior toward weird products are higher (lower), because of perceived funniness (failed sense-making of the product usefulness).



Citation:

Qian (Claire) Deng and Paul Messinger (2017) ,"20-R: Weird Products: Too Weird For Purchase, But Perfect For Sharing.", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1024-1024.

Authors

Qian (Claire) Deng, University of Alberta, Canada
Paul Messinger, University of Alberta, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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