Consumers and Managers Reject (Superior) Algorithms Because They Fail to Compare Them to the (Inferior) Alternative

In five experiments, I find that consumers and managers often choose (inferior) human judgment over (superior) algorithms (e.g. recommender systems) because they fail to compare algorithms’ performance to that of human judgment. Instead they decide whether or not to use an algorithm by comparing its performance to their performance goal.



Citation:

Berkeley J. Dietvorst (2017) ,"Consumers and Managers Reject (Superior) Algorithms Because They Fail to Compare Them to the (Inferior) Alternative", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 302-306.

Authors

Berkeley J. Dietvorst , University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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