“Don’T Tell Me What to Do!” Shoppers Rely Less on Consumer Reviews For Experiential Than Material Purchases

An analysis of 6,508,574 reviews on Amazon.com and six experiments reveal that shoppers rely less on consumer reviews for experiential purchases than for material purchases. This tendency is driven by perceptions of preference uniqueness: people believe that their evaluations are more unique for experiential purchases than for material purchases.



Citation:

Hengchen Dai, Cindy Chan, and Cassie Mogilner (2017) ,"“Don’T Tell Me What to Do!” Shoppers Rely Less on Consumer Reviews For Experiential Than Material Purchases", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 302-306.

Authors

Hengchen Dai, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Cindy Chan, University of Toronto, Canada
Cassie Mogilner, University of California Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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