10-B: Do You Feel Like a Fraud? How Experiencing the Impostor Phenomenon Influences Consumption Choices

Most people occasionally feel like a fraud. Usually we overcome these feelings by acknowledging why we deserve our accomplishments. There are times when, despite all external evidence, we feel like an impostor. We propose that a person experiencing the impostor phenomenon prefers products that allow them to hide fraudulent feelings.



Citation:

Emily Goldsmith and Stephen Gould (2017) ,"10-B: Do You Feel Like a Fraud? How Experiencing the Impostor Phenomenon Influences Consumption Choices", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1029-1029.

Authors

Emily Goldsmith, Marymount Manhattan College, USA
Stephen Gould, Baruch College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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