Donate to Be a Hero: Social Power Moderates the Effect of Incentives on Donation

Some research finds that self-benefiting incentives reduces donation but others find the opposite. We demonstrate that perceived social power can explain the inconsistency in the effect of incentives on donation. While offering incentives (both monetary and non-monetary) discourages powerful individuals from donating, it increases the donation intention among powerless individuals.



Citation:

Zheshuai Yang, Yan Zhang, and Yih Hwai Lee (2017) ,"Donate to Be a Hero: Social Power Moderates the Effect of Incentives on Donation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 129-134.

Authors

Zheshuai Yang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Yan Zhang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Yih Hwai Lee, National University of Singapore, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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