Preemptive Social Influence: (Not) Choosing Personal Favorites in Shared Consumption?

Consumers are less likely to choose their personal favorite option when making decisions for shared consumption. This effect is weakened when consumers believe that they are similar to others or there is a high-power distance in the society, and is strengthened when they share consumption with their close friends.



Citation:

Yijie Wang, Dongjin He, and Yuwei Jiang (2017) ,"Preemptive Social Influence: (Not) Choosing Personal Favorites in Shared Consumption?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1077-1077.

Authors

Yijie Wang, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Dongjin He, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Yuwei Jiang, Hong Kong Polytechnic University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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