Moral Identity and Brand Anthropomorphism

This research investigates the relationship between consumers’ moral identity and their preference for anthropomorphized brands. In three studies, we find that higher moral identity is consistently associated with greater preference for anthropomorphized (vs. non-anthropomorphized) brands. Higher moral identifiers’ perceptions of an anthropomorphized brand as being more “human-like” mediates this effect.



Citation:

Eric Levy, Sara Kim, and Americus Reed II (2017) ,"Moral Identity and Brand Anthropomorphism", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 350-355.

Authors

Eric Levy, University of Cambridge, UK
Sara Kim, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Americus Reed II, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

A11. When Political Neutrality Backfires

Ike Silver, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Alex Shaw, University of Chicago, USA
Rob Kurzban, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Featured

What Converts Webpage Visits into Crowdfunding Contributions: Assessing the Role of Circumstantial Information

Lucia Salmonson Guimarães Barros, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo
César Zucco Jr, Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration, Brazil
Eduardo B. Andrade, FGV / EBAPE
Marcelo Salhab Brogliato, Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration, Brazil

Read More

Featured

Resolving Humorous Incongruity in Advertising Facilitates Impressions of Firm Competence

*Chi Hoang, Norwegian School of Management, Norway
Klemens Knoferle, Norwegian School of Management, Norway
Luk Warlop, Norwegian School of Management, Norway

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.