The Burden of Social Proof

While a proliferation of insights from behavioral science is increasingly called upon for public service, little is known about the magnitude and downstream consequences of behavioral change. Here, we examine how social proof impacts short and longterm engagement in activities that are beneficial, though inherently threatening (e.g., medical testing).



Citation:

Preyas Desai, Mary Frances Luce, and Janet Schwartz (2017) ,"The Burden of Social Proof", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 36-41.

Authors

Preyas Desai, Duke University, USA
Mary Frances Luce, Duke University, USA
Janet Schwartz, Tulane University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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