Stigmatized Risk Factors in Health Messages: the Defensive Influence of Moral Identity

This paper examines how and when the presence of stigmatized sources of risk (e.g., unsafe sexual practices) influences effectiveness of vaccination appeals. Four experiments demonstrate that moral identity leads to defensive processing of stigmatized risk information and affects subsequent consumption. We show this effect is driven by enhanced self-positivity bias.



Citation:

Chethana Achar, Lea Dunn, and Nidhi Agrawal (2017) ,"Stigmatized Risk Factors in Health Messages: the Defensive Influence of Moral Identity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 36-41.

Authors

Chethana Achar, University of Washington, USA
Lea Dunn, University of Washington, USA
Nidhi Agrawal, University of Washington, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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