The Consumption Consequences of Couples Pooling Financial Resources

Does pooling money with your partner affect how it is spent? Five studies show that couples spending from a joint (vs. a separate) bank account are more likely to buy utilitarian products, and less likely to buy hedonic products. These differences are driven by an increased need to justify spending.



Citation:

Emily Garbinsky and Joe Gladstone (2017) ,"The Consumption Consequences of Couples Pooling Financial Resources", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 612-613.

Authors

Emily Garbinsky, University of Notre Dame, USA
Joe Gladstone, University College London, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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