10-P: Solving the Paradox of a Large Assortment: the Moderating Role of Choice Mode

Prior research on the effect of assortment size on purchase behavior revealed that consumers prefer a large (vs. small) assortment, but are less satisfied with the selected product from a large (vs. small) assortment. We demonstrate that the moderating effect of choice mode (instrumental vs. experiential) can explain this paradox.



Citation:

Mikyoung Lim and Young-Won Ha (2017) ,"10-P: Solving the Paradox of a Large Assortment: the Moderating Role of Choice Mode", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1045-1045.

Authors

Mikyoung Lim, Sogang University, Republic of Korea
Young-Won Ha, Sogang University, Republic of Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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